Focal Pointe Observatory
Astrophotography by Bob Franke

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NGC 2237-9  The Rosette Nebula


      Click the full screen zoom button           ^
     
Click the image to Zoom and Pan              

Click here to view the image without Zoomify (1950 x 1300, 509 KB)

 

 


      Click the full screen zoom button           ^
     
Click the image to Zoom and Pan              

Click here to view the image without Zoomify (1950 x 1300, 512 KB)

 

Instrument

12.5" RCOS @  ~f/9 (2880 mm fl) 1.28 arcsec / pixel.  The Zoomify image scale is 1.28 to 3.33 arcsec / pixel.

Mount

Paramount ME

Camera

SBIG STL-11000 w/ internal filter wheel, AstroDon Gen II Filters

Acquisition Data

2/10/2011 to 3/28/2011 Chino Valley, AZ... with CCDAutoPilot3 & CCDSoft.  AOL guided

Exposure

SII   690 min. (23 x 30 min. bin 1x1)

Hα    570 min. (19 x 30 min. bin 1x1)

OIII  630 min. (21 x 30 min. bin 1x1)

Click here for the RGB color image.

Click here for an Ha filtered b/w image.

Software

  • CCDSoft, CCDStack, Photoshop CS and Noel Carboni's actions..

  • PixFix32 (pre-beta) to repair column defects.

  • CCDStack to calibrate, register, normalize, data reject, combine the sub exposures.

  • PhotoShop for color combine &  on-linear stretching.

  • Noiseware Pro, a PhotoShop plug-in.

Comment

North is to the left.

 

This is a close up view of an interesting area inside the Rosette Nebula.  NGC 2237-9 are a large, circular hydrogen region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster, NGC 2244, is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars having been formed from the nebula's matter. The Nebula is about 100 light-years across and is about 5000 light-years away.

 

Both images were created using the Hubble color palette. The colors in the top image follow the spirit of the palette and the hydrogen (green), sulfur (red) and oxygen (blue) areas can easy be identified. The bottom image uses the same filter mapping with adjustments to the channel levels to create the blue and gold motif, made popular by the Hubble Imaging Team.